This seems a very natural question to ask in a First Communion class. At some point we might be curious how transubstantiation works, but a more more immediate practical question is just exactly WHAT does that communion wafer turn into. A youngster who is accustomed to getting served last, and who is raised in a family where they might actually serve a tripe dish like menudo might think of the question raised in this comic. The “regular American” little kids would not know the word “tripas” or “tripe” to begin with, and even if they knew it, it probably never occurred to them that those parts actually get eaten. And multilingual parents of bilingual kids don’t do their kids any favors by anglicising the pronunciation of foreign words for their kids. The only way the kid knows the word belongs to the language that “we don’t speak at school” is if the parents use the correct accent when they introduce it. If the kid thinks it is an English word and uses it at school, the other kids will laugh at them. Ask me how I know this.

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Transubstantiation: Practical considerations, 6.5 out of 10 based on 2 ratings